International Journal of Psychiatry Research

Vol. 3, Issue 1, Part A (2021)

Stigmatization of mental illness among health workers in JOS University Teaching Hospital

Author(s):

Dapap D D, Audu M D

Abstract:
Background: It has been suggested that those more knowledgeable about mental illness are less likely to endorse negative or stigmatizing attitudes. The objectives of the study was to determine stigma toward mental illness among health care providers and to determine their knowledge and beliefs about mental illness. Materials and Method: The investigation was a descriptive and cross-sectional study on a stratified and randomly selected sample population of 308 Health workers at the Jos University Teaching Hospital. Questionnaires were used to elicit responses from the respondents, using the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill (CAMI) scale. Information was also obtained on Knowledge and beliefs about possible causes of mental illness. Results: The result of the study showed that stigmatizing attitudes to the mentally ill are widely held even among health care providers. Although the respondents appeared to be knowledgeable about the possible role of psychosocial and genetic factors in causation of mental illness, 3.8% of them believed that mental illness could be caused by witches/wizards, 3.4% thought it could be a consequence of Devine punishment or curse. Conclusion: This study offers insights into how health care providers regard people with mental illness that may be helpful in designing appropriate training or re-training programs in Nigeria and other low-income African Countries.

Pages: 08-13  |  315 Views  107 Downloads

How to cite this article:
Dapap D D, Audu M D. Stigmatization of mental illness among health workers in JOS University Teaching Hospital. Int. J. Psychiatry Res. 2021;3(1):08-13.
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